Can You Get HIV from Someone on PrEP?

The existing chance of getting infected with HIV is a terrible thing that frightens each person living an active sex life. You have discovered that your partner is taking PrEP HIV-related medicine. Are you at risk now? Should you consult a doctor immediately? Find out from the article below.

PrEP drugs are special means that very effectively reduce the risk of HIV infection during intercourse if a person doesn’t use condoms. With the right administration, when it comes to unprotected sex with a partner with HIV the reliability of these pills reaches 99%. If to talk about sharing one needle, the risk of acquiring HIV remains, but it will be significantly reduced, too [1]. Such drugs have become a real breakthrough in HIV prophylaxis, their effect is quite understandable, but from time to time arise questions on which the instruction can’t give the precise answer. The question – “can you get HIV from someone on PrEP?” is one of the most popular. To understand this, you need to learn more about these tablets’ action.

🔍What Does PrEP Used For?

For a long time, condoms were the only protection against HIV, but now there are drugs that can minimize the risk of infection even with unprotected sex. Why people don’t always use condoms?

  1. Some of them can’t reach orgasm with a condom.
  2. There is no protection at hand at the moment.
  3. There may be allergic to latex.
  4. During oral sex, a lot of people prefer to refuse a condom, as this prevents pleasure.

Studies show that people in risk groups don’t have regular sexual partners, having sex without a condom, without fear that their casual partner can transmit a fatal disease. For those who share one needle, taking PrEP medications is the only way to avoid HIV.

PrEP drugs don’t allow the virus to multiply, therefore, if a healthy person using drugs HIV has no chance. If PrEP used properly, the protection level becomes very high. In addition to the possibility of avoiding a terrible disease, these drugs are able to give peace of mind, because you no longer need to worry that sexual intercourse could cause a bad blood test [2].

⚠️Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis and HIV Risks

As mentioned above, the risk of being infected by HIV with the correct use of pills is only 1%. Proper administration consists of daily intake at the same time of the day. If you didn’t take a pill or doing this irregularly, then the effectiveness of the drug will be reduced significantly. The maximum effect begins after seven days of regular use. The all effects of the drug pass after a week the last pill is taken.

In order for the drug to be not only as effective as possible, but also safe, you need to make sure that you:

  • have no contraindications;
  • don’t take drugs that can’t be combined with PrEP meds;
  • aren’t infected with HIV.

Before buying medicine, it is advisable to consult with a doctor, as these medicines have a strong effect on the body and often cause side effects.

If you find that your partner takes PrEP, it doesn’t mean that he or she is infected with HIV. On the contrary, your partner takes this drug for HIV prevention and is absolutely clean. Don’t make hasty self-standing conclusions, but just ask him or her about it. In addition, it is worth to note that dosages of PrEP for treating and preventing HIV differ significantly. However, if your partner is really infected and using PrEP then you still can be infected by him if not using condoms, but of course with much lower chances. To be in complete safety try to avoid unprotected sex and start using PrEP, too [3].

💡Takeaway

People who are at risk of being HIV-infected often think about starting taking such PrEP drugs. Who is at risk? Gays, bisexuals, transsexuals, prostitutes and those who use the services of prostitutes, sharing one needle persons, men, and women who live an active sex life and have a lot of partners, as well as doctors who can contact with the blood of people with HIV. If you are in such a group of risk, then discuss with your doctor the possibility of taking PrEP. It is likely that these pills will save your health and life [4].

PrEP drugs are a good solution for those people who are at risk as they are able to reliably protect against infection with a deadly disease and not prevent leading a normal life. These drugs can also be used for the treatment of HIV, but in a different dosage and only in combination with other medicines. This is important to remember that it’s not a serious reason to worry when you see that your partner takes PrEP medication. If you saw the pills, then you need to discuss this with a partner and you will get an answer for what purposes he or she uses such medicines. Most likely, you have nothing to fear. Although, you can always consult with a healthcare provider about this situation. But, in case, that you had unprotected sex with a person who really has HIV then you need to see a doctor as soon as possible. A specialist will prescribe a medicine that you need to take no later than 72 hours after intercourse – this significantly reduces the risk of infection.

Do you often change sex partners? Are you in contact with the blood of people who may be infected with HIV? Then you should start taking PrEP. These drugs will be able to turn the sexual intercourse into protected even without using a condom. Combining a condom with such drugs makes sex as safe as possible. See more details about PrEP medications at HIVPrEP.

📚References

  1. Preferences for Long-Acting Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), Daily Oral PrEP, or Condoms for HIV Prevention Among U.S. Men Who Have Sex with Men. Greene, G.J., Swann, G., Fought, A.J. et al. AIDS Behav (2017) 21: 1336.
  2. Pre-exposure prophylaxis. HIV.gov internet portal. Retrieved 21 May 2018.
  3. Sexual Risk Behaviors and Acceptability of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Among HIV-Negative Gay and Bisexual Men in Serodiscordant Relationships: A Mixed Methods Study. Ronald A. Brooks, Raphael J. Landovitz, Rachel L. Kaplan, Eli Lieber, Sung-Jae Lee, and Thomas W. Barkley. AIDS Patient Care and STDs. Vol. 26, No. 2. Feb 2012.
  4. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. PrEP. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
Logan Morris

Expert in pharmaceutical practice and antiviral medicine, founder of HIVPrEP. Main goal is to popularize HIV topics and create awareness for global masses on how to prevent the disease and how to use HIV medication safely.

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